How I Overcame TV Addiction, Reclaimed My Life and Gained Two Months Per Year

“In its easy provision of relaxation and escape, television can be beneficial in limited doses. Yet when the habit interferes with the ability to grow, to learn new things, to lead an active life, then it does constitute a kind of dependence and should be taken seriously.”

From “Television Addiction Is No Mere Metaphor”
— By Robert Kubey and Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi —

I have no way to prove this, but I’m sure it’s true: nobody on their deathbed ever wished they’d spent more time watching television. Life is short, and there are far too many activities that are more important and fulfilling than sitting in front of a television for hours on end. That’s not to suggest you should stop watching TV altogether. But I’ve come to see it as something best placed at the edge of life, rather than the center.

Victor J. Strecher on the Power of Purpose

“So let’s imagine a drug that was shown to add years to your life; reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke; cut your risk of Alzheimer’s disease by more than half; help you relax during the day and sleep better at night; double your chances of staying drug- and alcohol-free after treatment; activate your natural killer cells; diminish your inflammatory cells; increase your good cholesterol; and repair your DNA. What if this imaginary drug reduced hospital stays so much that it put a dent in the national health-care crisis? Oh, and as a bonus, gave you better sex? The pharmaceutical company who made the drug would be worth billions. The inventors of the drug would receive Nobel Prizes and have institutes named for them! But it’s not a drug. It’s purpose. And it’s free. Oh, and the side effects? More friends. More happiness. Deeper engagement in life. And did I mention better sex?”

Victor J. Strecher, Life on Purpose: How Living for What Matters Most Changes Everything

The Dhammavadaka by Bhante Dhammika

The Dhammavadaka by Bhante Dhammika

Remember always that you are just a visitor here, a traveler passing through. Your stay here is but short and the moment of your departure unknown.

None can live without toil and a craft that provides your needs is a blessing indeed. But if you toil without rest, fatigue and weariness will overtake you and you will be denied the joy that comes from labor’s end.

The Habit Loop – Use This Simple Framework to Help Break Your Bad Habits

If you’re anything like me, you have at least 1 or 2 bad habits that you’d like to change. In this short video, bestselling author Charles Duhigg shares what he calls “the habit loop.”

According to Duhigg, every habitual behavior involves three elements:

  • Cue – some sort of trigger that makes the behavior unfold automatically.
  • Routine – the behavior itself.
  • Reward – the benefit derived from engaging in the behavior.

As he describes so well in this video, if you want to break a bad habit, the trick is to learn to recognize the Cue, and replace the undesired behavior (Routine) with a more desirable behavior that delivers a similar Reward.

This is a simple – but powerful – framework for understanding habitual behavior and how to change it. For more, see The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business, by Charles Duhigg.